Chanel and Shalom Harlow Cut to the Chaise (Lounge)

New blog Part Nouveau, or ‘partly new’, delves into fashion history to showcase the inspiration–be it art, photography or design–behind some of today’s biggest fashion moments. It’s fascinating and impossible not to get lost in, so we asked the site’s founder, Lilah Ramzi, to give us a little history lesson each week. In this week's lesson, Shalom Harlow takes on the inimitable Coco Chanel.
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New blog Part Nouveau, or ‘partly new’, delves into fashion history to showcase the inspiration–be it art, photography or design–behind some of today’s biggest fashion moments. It’s fascinating and impossible not to get lost in, so we asked the site’s founder, Lilah Ramzi, to give us a little history lesson each week. In this week's lesson, Shalom Harlow takes on the inimitable Coco Chanel.

New blog Part Nouveau, or ‘partly new’, delves into fashion history to showcase the inspiration–be it art, photography or design–behind some of today’s biggest fashion moments. It’s fascinating and impossible not to get lost in, so we asked the site’s founder, Lilah Ramzi, to give us a little history lesson each week.

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Under the moniker of Horst P. Horst, German born Horst Paul Albert Bohrmann would photograph the beau monde and Parisian café society of the interwar years. The year Horst would meet Gabrielle Chanel, he took the most memorable and well-known photograph of the fashion designer’s life; an image that came to typify the elegance and enigmatic nature of the designer. Flouting the composition of traditional portraits, Chanel avoided a direct gaze with the camera, much like she did with inquiries on her childhood and upbringing. Although taken years earlier in 1937, the portrait was first published in the February 15, 1954 issue of Vogue.

In 1996, portraitist and fashion photographer Patrick Demarchelier would photograph Canadian model Shalom Harlow similarly coiffed and reclined in a chaise lounge, however, opting for direct eye contact instead.

Coco Chanel (Reclining) by Horst P. Horst, 1937

Coco Chanel (Reclining) by Horst P. Horst, 1937

Shalom Harlow by Patrick Demarchelier, 1996.

Shalom Harlow by Patrick Demarchelier, 1996.