Kate Upton Channels Marilyn Monroe for Vanity Fair's 100th Anniversary Issue

October will mark the 100th anniversary of Vanity Fair's very first issue published in 1913 (initially under the name of Dress & Vanity Fair). And to celebrate, the magazine did something a little different: Instead of just slapping a picture of a famous dead person on the cover, VF tapped Annie Leibovitz to photograph a modern-day celebrity merely dressed up like a famous dead person. It's the best of both worlds!
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October will mark the 100th anniversary of Vanity Fair's very first issue published in 1913 (initially under the name of Dress & Vanity Fair). And to celebrate, the magazine did something a little different: Instead of just slapping a picture of a famous dead person on the cover, VF tapped Annie Leibovitz to photograph a modern-day celebrity merely dressed up like a famous dead person. It's the best of both worlds!
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October will mark the 100th anniversary of Vanity Fair's very first issue published in 1913 (initially under the name of Dress & Vanity Fair). And to celebrate, the magazine did something a little different: Instead of just slapping a picture of a famous dead person on the cover, VF tapped Annie Leibovitz to photograph a modern-day celebrity merely dressed up like a famous dead person. It's the best of both worlds!

That modern-day celeb would be none other than Kate Upton, who channels VF's fave dead icon Marilyn Monroe in a champagne colored one-piece on the cover. Upton is set to blow out the candle on VF's birthday cake, jugs front-and-center--a sexy image that will probably pack a punch at newsstands.

The accompanying shoot inside the issue channels more history: According to VF.com, Leibovitz captured Upton lounging on the moon, in homage to magazine's very first cover.

Vanity Fair's first cover

Vanity Fair's first cover

The interview, however, is thankfully rooted in the here and now.

“I’m not going to name names, but one agency told me, ‘You’re too American, and everybody knows American women are lazy,'" Upton tells Vanity Fair contributing editor Jim Windolf in the interview. "I was so offended! I’ve never been so offended! I was like, ‘You know that you’re in America, right?’ And it wasn’t ‘American models’—it was ‘American women are lazy,’ period! I feel like a lot of women would disagree with that. A lot!"

Besides Upton's spread, the rest of the issue is broken up in homage to each of the 10 decades in the magazine's history--though WWD's Erik Maza points out that this is slightly misleading since the magazine was actually shuttered from the '40s through the '70s. Regardless, those decade-themed sections will include iconic images by Leibovitz, Mario Testino, Bruce Weber, and Edward Steichen, plus illustrations from the Jazz Age, as well as essays from Bill Maher, Dave Eggers, Kurt Andersen, Lorne Michaels, Robert Stone, Jan Morris, Daniel Okrent, Laura Hillenbrand, A. Scott Berg, and Julian Fellowes.

If that A-list cast of contributors doesn't sell issues well, then, that's what Upton's breasts on the cover are for, right?

Online, the magazine is taking the archival theme even further, publishing "two full digitized issues per decade from as far back as 1918." They also teamed up with American Express on 10 short films directed by "notable filmmakers." According to WWD, the first film is set to drop today on the magazine's website and YouTube Channel as well as on AmEx Now, an interactive brand channel. If we had to guess, we'd say that those videos will also be themed to celebrate a decade in the magazine's history--but we'll just have to stay tuned to find out for sure.