Pringle Spring 2014: Modernizing the Twinset

High-end knitwear purveyor Pringle of Scotland debuted its first collection under new head designer Massimo Nicosia in London this week--and he certainly didn't slack off in his attempt to create something relevant while keeping in mind Pringle's centuries of history.
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Dhani Mau
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High-end knitwear purveyor Pringle of Scotland debuted its first collection under new head designer Massimo Nicosia in London this week--and he certainly didn't slack off in his attempt to create something relevant while keeping in mind Pringle's centuries of history.
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High-end knitwear purveyor Pringle of Scotland debuted its first collection under new head designer Massimo Nicosia in London this week--and he certainly didn't slack off in his attempt to create something relevant while keeping in mind Pringle's centuries of history.

While talking us through the collection, he repeatedly mentioned his research into the Pringle archives and how old signatures inspired his designs. He explained that "the focus is always knitwear" and that, with this collection, he was "trying to combine activewear with couture and making everything very Pringle." He pointed out a diamond-shaped macramé--an update of an iconic Pringle diamond, and another updated Pringle staple: the twinset. He described the updated, bomber-esque shape as "Pringle moving forward."

And we like where he's going. There was a very cool, sort of sleeveless trench with an elegant cutout in the back revealing a wide red belt, which created a lovely silhouette. There were also springy macramé blouses and, of course, some great spring sweaters. Our favorites were a cream textured jumper with sort of a blended-in dickie around the neck and arms, a twinset with an interlocking blue diamond pattern, and a series of crewneck sweaters with three-dimensional textured designs down the front. The real highlights of the collection, though, were the not-too-athletic looking bomber jackets, some done in an ultra lightweight leather.

The setting for the presentation was a very fancy, very exclusive London hotel that I felt very underdressed and under-moneyed for (and I'd spent all day with fashion editors, so that's saying something). But the clothes themselves were rooted in accessibility and function. It felt like a collection of wardrobe staples and investment pieces.

Photos: IMAXtree