Queer-Friendly Label Marimacho Debuts at New York Fashion Week

Design duo and partners-in-love-and-fashion, Crystal and Ivette González-Alé’s debut Marimacho collection, Deep See, brought a motley crowd, a taste of what we were going to see at the show.
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Design duo and partners-in-love-and-fashion, Crystal and Ivette González-Alé’s debut Marimacho collection, Deep See, brought a motley crowd, a taste of what we were going to see at the show.
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I knew I was in for an epic experience as I walked up to The Space, a 19th century textile warehouse turned event space in Williamsburg. Design duo and partners-in-love-and-fashion, Crystal and Ivette González-Alé’s debut Marimacho collection, Deep See, brought a motley crowd, a taste of what we were going to see at the show: dapper, tailored threads and models encompassing a wide gender spectrum.

I saw a deep reverence for off-the-cuff street style: bright colors paired with tailored basics, bow-ties, florals and plaids, vintage leather boots. The palpable excitement of Marimacho’s debut took over everyone in The Space. We were transported into a water world; Atlantis 2050 inspired the Deep See collection, with hues drawn from the ocean—aqua, seaweed, coral, and sand--with a hint of outer space.

Underground. Underwater. Unisex.

The asymmetry and color-blocked shorts and use of silk, linen and mesh, all highlighted a playful complexity in what it means to be masculine. Marimacho’s creative director Ivette explained, “Marimacho’s Deep See Collection explores the full gamut of the ocean’s moods, dangers, and its possibilities for renewal, while encouraging its audience to embark on a journey of self-discovery."

The sea foam mesh fabric of the Net Tank revealed a sexy, bare-chested surprise. The short-sleeved Vacation Shirts have two pockets sewn on the chest, a reference to the act of binding breasts. The "Future Dandy," a term coined by the designers, wears shorts in the spring, and loads of linen, which felt simultaneously casual and luxurious. The one full suit in the collection was cream-colored lightweight wool with wood button details--a good look for an early summer wedding. There was a lax swagger to many of the looks: boy shorts matched with a fully unbuttoned, wide-striped button up or blazer sleeves hiked up to the elbows, '80s style.

The term "future dandy," was also vividly reflected in the models’ futurist make up, which included bold use of black eyeliner for eyebrows and silvery, ethereal skin and hair, styled by Davines’ Cesar Ramirez, and Karlo Karlo for Emani Vegan Cosmetics. The models reflected Marimacho’s muse--a range of masculine identities that have long been underserved by men and women’s wear. Each time a model came out, the crowd let out a cheer--besides being worn by supportive friends, each and every look had an adaptable silhouette, perfect for masculine folks, but honestly, as a feminine person, I’d wear it too. Androgyny has been quite the buzzword, but this felt more like a Tom Ford perfume--everyone wants to wear it, but it comes with a definitive, masculine edge.

Photos: Yanyi Luo, Manny Zoom, The Artchitects

Tanwi Nandini Islam is a writer and artist living in Brooklyn, NY. Her debut novel is forthcoming by Viking Penguin. Follow her @tanwinandini.

Click through to see the collection.