Elie Tahari Is the Latest Designer to Become CEO of His Own Company

At our How I'm Making It conference this spring, many designers stressed the importance of having someone in their company to run the business side, allowing them the freedom to focus on designing clothes. However, a few established designers these days seem set on proving that they're more than capable of pulling double duty.
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Dhani Mau
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At our How I'm Making It conference this spring, many designers stressed the importance of having someone in their company to run the business side, allowing them the freedom to focus on designing clothes. However, a few established designers these days seem set on proving that they're more than capable of pulling double duty.
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At our How I'm Making It conference this spring, many designers stressed the importance of having someone in their company to run the business side, allowing them the freedom to focus on designing clothes. However, a few established designers these days seem set on proving that they're more than capable of pulling double duty.

The latest is Elie Tahari, who will take on the role of CEO at the company he founded, replacing former CEO Bob Galvin, who will transition into a consulting role, WWD reports. A rep for the company confirmed the news to Fashionista.

“I would like to thank Bob for all his efforts and accomplishments and his dedication to the brand. I look forward to working with the executive management team as we move forward during this period of exceptional growth,” Tahari, who is celebrating his namesake brand's 40th anniversary this year, told WWD.

The news comes just a couple of weeks after Christopher Bailey was named CEO of Burberry -- a move that's been met with skepticism among investors and analysts. Other designer CEOs include Giorgio Armani and Ralph Lauren, both of whom, like Tahari (and unlike Bailey) founded the companies they run. Still, we can't help but wonder if the Bailey news inspired Tahari's new, additional position. If he or she is up for the task, what designer wouldn't want full control over his company?