Google Glass Gets Way More Wearable With 4 New Frames

Slated for a late 2014 release to the public, Google is trying to make things a bit chicer in the meantime. And those Warby Parker collaboration rumors? Not true.
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Eliza Brooke
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Slated for a late 2014 release to the public, Google is trying to make things a bit chicer in the meantime. And those Warby Parker collaboration rumors? Not true.

Photo: Google

Photo: Google

Despite Diane Von Furstenberg and Nina Garcia rocking Google Glass at fashion weeks past, the device has thus far been more of a novelty item than a true accessory. Well, Google has just taken a big step forward in making Glass more wearable and market-ready, with the release of four titanium prescription frames and three sunglasses that attach to the Glass device.

All four of the prescription frames were designed in-house and selected for their appeal to the current eyewear market. They fall on the modern side of glasses design, including split, thin and thick frames, and a rounded, Warby Parker-ish frame, and are available in five colorways: Charcoal, Cotton, Shale, Sky and Tangerine.

On the subject of Warby Parker, there's the matter of the persistent rumor that the eyeglass maker would be designing frames for Google Glass. A Google rep told us this morning that the rumor is, sadly, inaccurate, and that Google has not had and does not currently have any kind of partnership with Warby Parker. Meanwhile, a Warby Parker rep told us that they were unable to comment on the Glass rumors.

Google Glass is slated to become widely available in late 2014. Currently Glass is still in its Explorer program, which allows people to purchase the device before its market debut as the product team iterates on the device's design.

As Google Glass product director Steve Lee told CNET, adding prescriptions to Google Glass could do a lot to make it more socially acceptable, as 60 percent of Americans need corrective vision. Whereas earlier versions of the product may have looked futuristic to the point of being unwearable, adding frames gives the device a familiar context.

Diane Von Furstenberg wears a previous version of Google Glass. Photo: Frazer Harrison / Getty

Diane Von Furstenberg wears a previous version of Google Glass. Photo: Frazer Harrison / Getty

The prescription frames cost $225 each and the shades are $150. That's in addition to the $1,500 entry fee to the Explorer program.

We still have the majority of the year to go before the Glass mainstream debut, so here's hoping for some kind of designer collaboration in the future. The current frames are pretty good, but they're not quite there yet from a style perspective.

Check out all the new frames here.