From Carven to Rick Owens: Highlights From Day 3 of Paris Fashion Week

I am inclined to say that I can't believe it's only day three of Paris Fashion Week. But I am also loathe to say it, given that I will feel the same way up until day six, when I will begin saying, "I can't believe it's almost over."
Avatar:
Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
158
I am inclined to say that I can't believe it's only day three of Paris Fashion Week. But I am also loathe to say it, given that I will feel the same way up until day six, when I will begin saying, "I can't believe it's almost over."
Looks from Carven, Nina Ricci, Rick Owens and Christian Wijnants. Photos: Imaxtree

Looks from Carven, Nina Ricci, Rick Owens and Christian Wijnants. Photos: Imaxtree

I am inclined to say that I can't believe it's only day three of Paris Fashion Week. But I am also loathe to say it, given that I will feel the same way up until day six, when I will begin saying, "I can't believe it's almost over."

Thursday, of course, was a long one, and mine started with Carven. Designer Guillaume Henry did two things particularly well this morning: above-the-ankle wool skirts -- which he managed to give movement with a deep diagonal slit -- and thigh-high boots, which are popular right now, but very difficult to perfect. What made them special? Henry's midi-length was A-line, but still narrow enough not to look too retro. And the boots succeeded because they were a bit wider than most at the thigh, adding a bit of ease. Henry's look isn't typically seductive, but this season's mix of schoolgirl and sexpot gave him a new edge.

At Nina Ricci, designer Peter Copping did what he does best: elegant clothes that women will actually wear come fall. I love a skirt suit, and his grey wool wrap-skirt and matching blazer didn't disappoint. Copping showed plenty of turtlenecks as well (who didn't, this season?), and a favorite was a blousy dress in the prettiest lavender.

After Ricci, Stephanie and I took the Fashion Bus to Rick Owens -- I love the Fashion Bus! -- where we were seated front row alongside everyone else. (Yes, Owen dog-eared a page in Marc Jacobs' NYFW book and created a layout that allowed for only one row of seats.) Alyssa reported Thursday on Owens' cast of models, which was mostly made up of non-professionals. (A commenter on Instagram took offense to the fact that I called them "real women," given that models are real, too, gosh darn-it. I guess he's right.) Anyway, the clothes -- mostly tunics and pants paired with leather boots that reminded me of Bensimons -- had a tubular look to them. (They seemed to compel the models -- professional or not -- to sort of bounce down runway.) The wool felt coats and jackets were particularly appealing.

Finally, it was off to Christian Wijnants, whose things I occasionally see on that racks at Bird in Brooklyn. His color choice's this season were deft: he used pastels, but not the typical ones. (Pale peach, avocado and sky blue dominated rather than pink and lavender.) And he somehow managed to make calico patchwork look more futuristic than old-fashioned.