Kanye West Compares Himself to Michaelangelo to Explain Frustrations With Fashion Career

On Tuesday night's episode of Late Night with Seth Meyers, Kanye West dropped by and once again took his appearance as an opportunity to air his grievances about the fashion industry.
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Alyssa Vingan Klein
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On Tuesday night's episode of Late Night with Seth Meyers, Kanye West dropped by and once again took his appearance as an opportunity to air his grievances about the fashion industry.
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On Tuesday night's episode of Late Night with Seth Meyers, Kanye West dropped by and once again took his appearance as an opportunity to air his grievances about the fashion industry. Meyers, who is a favorite of Anna Wintour's, wasted no time in asking West about his fashion career, and whether he approaches it differently from making music. While West's reply was predictably long-winded and confusing, he expressed the same sentiment as he has many times before: He's tired of being boxed in by the fashion powers that be. West explained:

"I give you paintings, sonic paintings. I have synesthesia, I can see sound. So when I do fashion, I want to give you sculptures -- it's like Michaelangelo, the church wanted him to paint and he wanted to do sculptures. The difficult thing for me is that I just want to be able to use marble and make sculptures, but due to the fact that I'm a celebrity and all these different things, they're like, 'No, you can't do this, you have to do this kind of line.' And it's the first of its kind, so there's been a lot of confusion about why I want to do it and why I'm so frustrated about it... it's an overall creative expression."

West has ranted about the fashion industry and its major players so many times that it's been difficult to keep track, but whether he's targeting Nike or Fendi, the bottom line is that he craves the freedom to be able to design whatever he wants, without brands or corporate figures limiting his ideas (read: not shooting down his leather jogging pants).

What West doesn't seem to understand, however, is that while creative autonomy is certainly important in the fashion industry, so is commerciality, which is something he hasn't really achieved in his fashion endeavors thus far. As Christina Binkley so brilliantly wrote in the Wall Street Journal in November, "Didn’t [West's] pals in fashion, like Ricardo Tisci, Peter Dundas and Olivier Theyskens, tell you about the 'commercial collections' that they don’t put on their runways – the ones designed by their assistants, which stores gobble up?" She also points out that West is unreliable as an investment, having backed away from his last fashion line after two seasons.

West is much more focused on his music than his clothing. Rumor has it that he's planning on jumping back into the world of high fashion, and if he dedicates the proper time to come up with something that's cohesive, commercial and creative, we're thinking these industry-related rants might actually be able to come to an end.

You can watch West's full interview (which, believe it or not, is pretty funny) over at NBC.