APC Offers the Antidote to 'Fashion Stockholm Syndrome' for Fall 2014

It also fueled our obsession with all things navy.
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It also fueled our obsession with all things navy.

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There are very few shows or presentations during Paris Fashion Week where I make a legitimate shopping list. (It would be nice to do for Christophe Lemaire’s Hermes collection, but I’m a freelance writer, not a Facebook founder.)

APC, though, allows for some hefty mental pre-orders. You see, I’m a bit of an addict. I know that I’m addicted because I shop there almost as much as my friend Sidney, who is definitely in need of an APC intervention. But maybe it’s okay for us to drain our savings there, because at least these are clothes that we can wear next season, and next year, and the year after that. What I like about the stuff is that it is truly utilitarian. When you study Scarlett Johansson’s wardrobe in Lost in Translation – which consists mostly of APC – it’s amazing to see that each piece still works a decade later.

Fall 2014 was no different. "Everybody is doing couture. I'm following the rules and doing actual ready to wear," founder Jean Touitou half-joked at the label's Left Bank studio on Tuesday. (He teases, but he's serious, too.) This season, that meant clothes that were an antidote to "Fashion Stockholm Syndrome," the term Touitou coined for fashion people who constantly complain about working in fashion but never actually escape it.

These were the clothes for more grounded fashion people. There were shirtdresses layered over printed turtlenecks, pussy-bow blouses paired with baseball jackets, and lots and lots of navy. Indeed, I'd say roughly 80 percent of the collection was rendered in my favorite color, which means I'm 80 percent more likely to buy it all.

Click through to see every look.