John Galliano Promises to Come Back "Bigger and Stronger"

He knows what he did "will never fade away," but he's trying to gain forgiveness anyway.
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Tyler McCall
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He knows what he did "will never fade away," but he's trying to gain forgiveness anyway.
The designer at a press conference for L'Etoile in May. Photo: KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/Getty

The designer at a press conference for L'Etoile in May. Photo: KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/Getty

Disgraced designer John Galliano continues his apology tour with French weekly magazine Le Point. In the June 5 issue, Galliano sits down with psychiatrist Boris Cyrulnik -- whose parents died during World War II in the Nazi deportations -- to talk about the long road he has taken to recovery and what's next for his career. 

While he doesn't discuss L'Etoile, the Russian cosmetics company for which Galliano was named creative director, he says that work is his therapy. He expressed his belief that he could still do work for the theatre, for movies and in haute couture. "I have yet to produce my best collection," he says. "The new Galliano will be bigger and stronger."

He also, naturally, discusses the events of February 24, 2011, the night of his now-infamous anti-Semitic rant. "What happened in the Parisian café La Perle was a defense mechanism," he explains

"I repeated a pattern I had known so well as an adolescent [Galliano explains in the interview that he was tormented at school for being gay], and I was under an explosive mix of alcohol and drugs. I don't want to make excuses for myself, but I want to explain what addiction can do to a person. I was no longer myself. I felt provoked, and I said the most horrible, the most intolerable, the most terrible thing there is to say."

And though Galliano says that he "rebuilt" himself, he still takes the incident very seriously. He sees an addiction specialist three times a week, partners with an AA companion (the stylist Alexis Roche), and continues to seek out and apologize to those affected by his terrible words. (The interview itself was reportedly requested by Galliano as part of his recovery process.)

"I've stopped being the victim," he says. "What I did will never fade away, but I regret it."