Jeremy Scott's Spring Show Gets Miley-ified

He's just being Jeremy.
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He's just being Jeremy.
Cyrus and Scott taking a finale bow together. Photo: Imaxtree

Cyrus and Scott taking a finale bow together. Photo: Imaxtree

The buzz around Jeremy Scott's spring 2015 show, which featured jewelry by Miley Cyrus, was easily the wildest of NYFW. Because with Cyrus, you never know what you're going to get (ice cream pasties, anyone?), though you're pretty much guaranteed it's going to be shocking. 

But here's the rub: Cyrus's jewelry for Scott's show — and her appearance in general — wasn't very shocking at all. Any longtime followers of Cyrus's Instagram account know that she's been working on craft projects for some time, including a five-foot-tall bongsome sculptures and jewelry. The appearance of pom-pom necklaces, embellished birthday hats and Coachella (or maybe Burning Man) headpieces at Scott's show was exactly what anyone who had done six minutes of research (or read her V magazine profile) would expect. 

And then there was Cyrus herself, who appeared in a rainbow bra top, loose patterned trousers and Adidas boots with her hair tied up in a little pouf adorned with charms and tchotchkes. She wore white eyeliner and sat with her mother and sister politely before and during the show. Cyrus even took a giggling turn on the runway with Scott during his bow. Compared to the wild ideas that ran through our heads pre-show (Will there be pasties? A giant hot dog blowup? Singing? Twerking?!), the end result was pretty tame.

But maybe that's OK. The collection, which took inspiration from DIY hippie and music festival culture, was one of Scott's best of recent memory. High notes included '60s neon florals, metallic gold leather, Shrek-emblazoned sweaters, faux fur, patchwork, tie dye and so much more. It was like the title cards of "That '70s Show" had come to life in clothing form, and with the rest of the fashion industry mining that era for inspiration, it only seemed fit for Scott to provide his dramatic and twisted take on the decade's mainstays. It was also a fairly wearable collection, with A-line skirts that even the most demure girls could love. And the patchwork leather jacket Scott wore during his bow? A sure street style hit.