John Galliano Loses Unfair Dismissal Case Against Dior and His Namesake Label

He claims the two companies knew about his addictions.
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He claims the two companies knew about his addictions.
John Galliano at the opening of a Dior boutique in 2010. Photo: Jason Kempin/Getty Images

John Galliano at the opening of a Dior boutique in 2010. Photo: Jason Kempin/Getty Images

John Galliano's name is officially back in the news — first because of his recent appointment as creative director of Maison Martin Margiela, and again on Tuesday, when he lost his unfair dismissal lawsuit against his two former employers: Christian Dior SA and John Galliano SA.

Back in 2013, Galliano thought he was all but a shoo-in to win the suit after a French court ruled in his favor, moving the trial to a labor court instead of a commercial court. (Galliano was fired from Dior and his namesake label — both owned by LVMH — after his very public anti-Semitic and racist rant in Paris in 2011.) But according to WWD, at a hearing on Tuesday, the French labor court ruled against Galliano, who was asking both parties for damages between 2.4 million to roughly 13 million euros. Galliano now owes each winning party one symbolic euro (approximately $1.26) each because of the ruling. 

Turns out the labor court didn't buy into Galliano's defense that he was unfairly dismissed. He claims that both employers were completely knowledgable of his debilitating addiction to prescription drugs and alcohol — so basically it wasn't his fault.

"The two companies were fully aware of my state," Galliano said in French during the two-hour-long hearing, according to WWD. "I took Valium so I could get through fittings." 

The designer also blamed professional pressures within both companies for the addiction that led to his downward spiral.

"I can't let the 17 years I spent and enjoyed at Dior be blackened like this. During these years as creative director of this house, I did not realize that its success, multiplying its sales by four, came at a destructive and exorbitant cost: my physical and mental health," Galliano also said, while reading from a pre-prepared statement. "Always more work, always more obligations, always more pressure, a dangerous and pathological spiral, without control."

As of now, there's no word on the possibility of appealing the verdict, but Galliano will have lots to keep him busy in his new role at Maison Martin Margiela. Hopefully he has a better handle on things this time around.