Kim Kardashian Comes to Art Basel Miami to Fete 'Paper' Magazine Cover

We caught up with the lead minds at 'Paper' to learn how the shoot came about and what they're going to do next.
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We caught up with the lead minds at 'Paper' to learn how the shoot came about and what they're going to do next.
Kim Kardashian arrives at the 'Paper' dinner in Miami. Photo: Madison McGaw/BFAnyc.com

Kim Kardashian arrives at the 'Paper' dinner in Miami. Photo: Madison McGaw/BFAnyc.com

Kim Kardashian broke the Internet a few weeks ago, and to celebrate that iconic Jean-Paul Goude cover during Art Basel in Miami Beach, Paper magazine threw a lavish bacchanalian feast Thursday night at the stylish 1111 Lincoln Road. Not even a nasty rainstorm could keep Kardashian away, who made her Art Basel 2014 debut around 8:30 pm. Fashion designer Timo Weiland, Dannijo designer Danielle Snyder, supermodel Jourdan Dunn, DJ Harley Viera Newton and artist Jeanette Hayes were among the stylish guests from who attended the dinner party, which was hosted in partnership with Sprout by HP and DKNY.

We spoke to Paper Chief Creative Officer Drew Elliott, the genius behind the magazine’s #breaktheinternet issue, about its inception three months ago. Kardashian had approached the New York lifestyle bible with a desire to collaborate, and was already booked for the winter issue cover. “We hatched the plan and so we talked about Jean Paul Goude, who is an amazing photographer, if he would take a photograph of Kim, and I said, ‘Oh my god, it would break the Internet,’” explained Elliott. “So Mickey Boardman was like, ‘That’s a fabulous idea.’” Then, they thought of other personalities who could break the Internet. “So it was James Franco, it was Cameron Dallas, it was the Fat Jew,“ said Elliott.

David Hershkovitz, Kim Kardashian, Kim Hastreiter and Mickey Boardman. Photo: Madison McGaw/BFAnyc.com

David Hershkovitz, Kim Kardashian, Kim Hastreiter and Mickey Boardman. Photo: Madison McGaw/BFAnyc.com

#Breaktheinternet has since made a place for itself in pop culture. “When we set out to do this there were 189 uses of the hashtag #breaktheinternet on Instagram,” said Elliott. “Today, there are almost 100,000, so you see how people adopt it for things other than just our cover... it’s become part of the pop culture vernacular.”

Paper founder and Co-Editor in Chief Kim Hastreiter said she’s never seen anything like this in her 30 years at the magazine. “The Internet is f*cking mental,” she said. “We rebooted publishing a little bit. They sold out in like two days.” 

How on earth does she plan to top that cover? “Everyone asks me who I’m putting on the cover next, and I say God,” she joked.