Vivienne Westwood Delivers Asbestos to British Prime Minister, Gucci Addict Buzz Bissinger Auctions Off His Leather

And Burberry is helping holiday shoppers via Twitter.
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And Burberry is helping holiday shoppers via Twitter.
Dame Vivienne and son Joe Corré bring a yultide protest to David Cameron's house. Photo: Carl Court/Getty Images.

Dame Vivienne and son Joe Corré bring a yultide protest to David Cameron's house. Photo: Carl Court/Getty Images.

Vivienne Westwood may be a Dame, but she’s got balls. For her latest form of political protest against fracking, the punk designer and her son, Joe Corré  (founder of Agent Provocateur), went to British Prime Minister David Cameron’s home with an early Christmas gift: a box marked “asbestos” carried by a gas-masked Santa. Though the contents were probably not truly harmful, Westwood’s message was that the British government's use of new drilling technology could potentially cause health risks to the public, like asbestos did. The thoughtful gift didn't make it through the doors, but Westwood dropped off a “Christmas card” from her lobbying group Talk Fracking signed by Thom Yorke, Stella McCartney, Bianca Jagger, Sir Antony Gormley, Yoko Ono and 145 other supporters of the campaign. {Dazed}

"Friday Night Lights" author Buzz Bissinger is taking the next step in moving past his shopping addiction by auctioning off about 150 of his leather items. In 2013 the journalist wrote a six-page article for GQ detailing his obsession with buying luxury goods, particularly Gucci, and later went to rehab. Now Bissinger says he’s ready to put that dark period behind him, and he's selling a mix of jackets, pants and boots that retail from $550 to $22,000 — most of which have never been worn. But if you’re hoping to buy some of Bissinger’s beloved Gucci you’re out of luck: the writer is holding on to “virtually all of the Gucci items I wrote about in GQ.” {GQ}

It looks like Roberto Cavalli may be looking to sell the majority stake of his namesake brand to Italian equity firm, Clessindra. The will-he-or-won’t-he game has been in play since 2009 when a deal with Clessindra for a 30 percent stake in the company fell through. Now sources say the firm is back and looking to take much more: 90 percent of the fashion house. The deal is expected to be finalized in Q1 of 2015. If it goes through, Francesco Trapani would become president of the Cavalli company, while the designer would remain a shareholder and help the new team develop the brand. {WWD}

Wolford’s team continues to grow with a new CEO. Ashish Sensarma will take over on Jan. 7, following Holger Dahmen who held the position for 10 years before stepping down earlier this year. Sensarma will work with the Austrian hosiery brand’s new Creative Director Grit Seymour. {WWD}