Opening Ceremony's Photo-centric Fall Collection Has a Deeper Meaning

Carol Lim and Humberto Leon spoke with Natasha Lyonne about the inspiration (and process) behind their fall/winter 2015 collection
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Carol Lim and Humberto Leon spoke with Natasha Lyonne about the inspiration (and process) behind their fall/winter 2015 collection
Photo: Jennifer Graylock/Getty Images

Photo: Jennifer Graylock/Getty Images

Nearly 24 hours after debuting their fall/winter 2015 collection, Opening Ceremony founders Carol Lim and Humberto Leon took the time to sit down with friend and actress Natasha Lyonne at the Apple Store in SoHo to chat about their most recent endeavor.

“There’s a real collaborative spirit with OC,” gushed Lyonne. “It’s all about getting together all kinds of creative types to make things that are really cool and individual and have a real point of view. I think at a time like this, Fashion Week in New York City, where everything is so horrific -- this is a really nice thing to have amongst us.” 

Whether Lyonne was joking about the actual experience of New York Fashion Week -- or simply referring to the current near-freezing temps -- is beside the point. Quite simply, Opening Ceremony’s runway “show” (a hybrid between fashion presentation and art exhibit) this season allowed the #fashionflock to pause for a moment, and take in the actual creative collaboration behind the new collection.

Photo: Monica Schipper/Getty Images

Photo: Monica Schipper/Getty Images

The design process started about nine months ago, when award-winning director and screenwriter Spike Jonze unveiled 20 years' worth of film photography — 240 photographs, to be exact, spanning from 1995 to 2005 — for Leon. “I’d been bugging [Jonze] to see his photos for six or seven years,” he said. The two have been friends for almost a decade, and although Jonze has been a major player in the OC world (he directed the brand’s presentation-meets-play last season), this was the first time show-goers viewed his work from a time when he was still just a budding music video director.

“I think what was really great was the way people got to experience two distinct things: the clothing and these photographs that have never been seen before,” explained Lim. “It was a very special moment.” Attendees were able to experience Jonze’s photos for one night only, which included portraits of skaters, BMX riders and era-defining artists like Nirvana, Sonic Youth, and Björk, in the form of exhibited and collage-style prints on tops, bottoms and coats.

Leon and Lim, who grew up in the “pre-Internet” times in the suburbs of Los Angeles and then the Bay Area, aimed to create a collection that took them back to those moments when subcultures thrived and information (or even Wi-Fi for that matter) wasn’t so readily available. “We are moving really fast. How do we stop and look?” asked Leon. “We have our computers, and you can use it for such good. But then there’s something really nice about the medium of photography, waiting to see that roll of film. Are there any good photos from it? I think yesterday was about this moment of process and appreciating that.”

Photo: Monica Schipper/Getty Images

Photo: Monica Schipper/Getty Images