Rag & Bone Ditched the Easy, Cool Girl Hair and Went Weird

Why they did it, and how to get the 'Fifth Element'-inspired punk look at home.
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Eliza Brooke
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Why they did it, and how to get the 'Fifth Element'-inspired punk look at home.
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You never expect the beauty look at Rag & Bone to be anything close to wacky. Easy, cool, downtown: yes, yes and yes. But this season designers David Neville and Marcus Wainwright finally decided to mix things up. They went weird.

"They wanted something very conceptual, like really off the track for Rag & Bone," lead hairstylist Paul Hanlon said backstage. "I think they feel like they get put in this category of a really New York, cool girl, and I think they wanted to do something different this time."

Hanlon tossed out a number of references for the look he created: Milla Jovovich in "The Fifth Element," Joan of Arc, punk. His team wrapped the models' hair around their heads, flattening it down with hairnets, blow driers and a boatload of Bumble & Bumble hairspray. The ends of their strands created spunky little Jovovich bangs, and the team cut some additional fringes out of fake hair to add in when the look needed more weight.

Hanlon said his team landed on this look almost without thinking after growing frustrated with a series of tests that weren't quite right. The final results were matted and mussed-up but almost elegant when paired with the simple, clean makeup look Gucci Westman created.

"You have to be careful that it doesn't start to become very even or commercial, almost too Mia Farrow. I don't want it to look like that," Hanlon said. "I want it to have more of an extremeness to it. Just very haphazard. The punks used to cut their hair with broken pieces of glass so the hair would shred, and it just has that element to it."

So maybe don't try to recreate the look by taking a broken bottle to your own hair. But if you're in for a DIY, we do suggest stopping at the drugstore on your way home to stock up on product.

"Really, it's just all about the hairspray," Hanlon said. "Lots and lots of hairspray."