Must Read: Rafael Nadal Models Tommy Hilfiger Underwear, Marc Jacobs Is Having an Insane Fashion Week Party

And for the first time in recent retail history, teens are shopping more like their parents.
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And for the first time in recent retail history, teens are shopping more like their parents.
An image from Rafael Nadal's Tommy Hilfiger Underwear campaign. Photo: Tommy Hilfiger

An image from Rafael Nadal's Tommy Hilfiger Underwear campaign. Photo: Tommy Hilfiger

These are the stories making headlines in fashion this Tuesday.

Rafael Nadal is the chiseled new face of Tommy Hilfiger Underwear
Starting this fall, the world's eighth-ranked tennis player, Rafael Nadal, will serve as brand ambassador for Tommy Hilfiger's underwear and tailored clothing range, as well as a new men's fragrance, TH Bold. The 29-year-old Spanish native signed a two-year contract with the brand, during which Tommy Hilfiger plans to relaunch its underwear business. {WWD}

Marc Jacobs is hosting an '80s-themed party during New York Fashion Week
Marc Jacobs, bless his heart, is celebrating the release of Gloss, a book about '70s photo legend Chris Von Wangenheim, with an absolutely insane-sounding party during New York Fashion Week. Held at infamous '80s nightclub Tunnel, the shindig plans to enforce an intimidatingly strict dress code, including (but not limited it): "fur coats over lingerie," "cowl neckline halters" and "no flat shoes." We'll be there. {Yahoo}

Stephanie Seymour is the new face of The Room at Hudson's Bay
Iconic '90s supe, swimsuit model and actress Stephanie Seymour fronts The Room at Hudson's Bay's fall 2015 campaign. In the ads, a seemingly ageless Seymour, now 47, wears a number of top labels including Proenza Schouler and Balmain. The department store chain is no stranger to '90s-era supermodels: Seymour's onetime colleague, Linda Evangelista, starred in its campaign last season. {Fashion Gone Rogue}

Teens are shopping more like their recession-tainted parents
For the first time in recent retail history, teenagers are shopping more like their parents — which is to say, more conservatively. As evidenced by this summer's back-to-school season, today's kids are being more "thrifty," recycling more clothing and abandoning the spending sprees of years past. Merchants are taking some time to adapt. {Business of Fashion}