Guests Took the Marc Jacobs Party Dress Code Seriously

See inside the highly-anticipated, Studio 54-esque affair.
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Dhani Mau
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See inside the highly-anticipated, Studio 54-esque affair.
Marc Jacobs. Photo: Marc Jacobs

Marc Jacobs. Photo: Marc Jacobs

If you've ever read about Studio 54 or watched "The Last Days of Disco" and wished you'd been an adult in New York City during that time, Marc Jacobs's New York Fashion Week party Thursday night — a launch event for "Gloss," a new monograph of Chris Von Wagenheim's photographs — would have been a dream come true.

When invitations went out, much fuss was made over the event's "strict Dress Code to Kill," printed on it in all caps: 

FUR COATS OVER LINGERIE, LIP GLOSS, JERRY HALL SIDE-SWEPT HAIR, SEQUINS, GOLD LAMÉ TURBANS, PATTI HEARST SYMBIONESE LIBERATION ARMY GEAR, ROGUE, ROLLERINA CHIC, SHEER HAREM PANTS, MINI SKIRTS AND MUSCULAR LEGS, PLATINUM RECORDS AS HEAD GEAR, SEQUINS, GRACE JONES BUTCH REALNESS, GLOSS-Y SKIN, BLEACHED EYEBROWS, SLITS, RIDING IN ON A WHITE HORSE, SEQUINS, SKY HIGH STILETTOS, MIRRORED AVIATORS, METAL MESH, COWL NECKLINE HALTERS, OR EYES OF LAURA MARS CHIC. NO FLAT SHOES. NO MATTE SURFACES. NO NATURAL LOOKS.

That the over-the-top requirements generated headlines all over the web was no surprise to a Marc Jacobs publicist we spoke with. It also inspired guests to take them more seriously. As someone who doesn't own one single item of clothing that bears sequins (shameful I know), I approached the entrance of "Tunnel" (a relic of the '90s club scene that is now actually an event space called The Waterfront) nervously, hoping my metallic gold heels would get me in despite the matte surfaces that made up the rest of my outfit. No one even looked at them.

What guests saw upon entering the party. Photo: Marc Jacobs

What guests saw upon entering the party. Photo: Marc Jacobs

In the end, the dress code wasn't very strictly enforced. But it did, as Jacobs surely intended, make the party more fun. As party guest and former Marc by Marc Jacobs Creative Director Katie Hillier put it: "It's a fucking great party! There's alcohol and we're all wearing sequins."

It wasn't just the outfits, though: It was the loud disco music, the free alcohol, the copious dancing space, and the cavernous, truly tunnel-like venue that somehow felt more exciting because of the debauchery everyone knew had taken place there years before. There were also the hired models — all wearing bikinis, heels and fur coats — positioned inside actual cages and on top of old cars. And then there were the drag queens, having the most fun.

Click through the gallery below to see what everyone wore.