Phillip Lim's Spring 2016 Show Will Feature a Sculptural Installation by Maya Lin

The designer is collaborating with the artist behind the Vietnam Veteran's Memorial in Washington, D.C. on a special 10-year anniversary show.
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The designer is collaborating with the artist behind the Vietnam Veteran's Memorial in Washington, D.C. on a special 10-year anniversary show.
Photo: Instagram/@31philliplim

Photo: Instagram/@31philliplim

At 3 p.m. on Sept. 14, Phillip Lim will host his 10th anniversary show, and to make it extra special, the artist Maya Lin — who rose to fame at age 21 when she was chosen to design the Vietnam Veteran's Memorial in Washington, D.C. — will be creating an installation for the space.

To tease the collaboration, the designer posted to Instagram a panoramic view of Lin's permanent earthwork, "Wavefield," located at the Storm King Art Center in Mountainville, New York.

According to Lim, Lin wasn't initially interested in collaborating. Lim's partner, Wen Zhou, had met the artist at a dinner, which followed with a meeting at Lin's studio. "Her attitude, at first, was that she didn’t do fashion. She was going to recommend someone else for us to work with," Lim told Vogue.com. "But then we kept talking, and I guess something connected, and she said, 'Can I give you some sketches?'"

Inventive sets can be a cause for extra buzz during fashion week. Take, for example, the reaction to Dries Van Noten's spring 2015 show, where models traipsed across a moss-adorned runway by Argentine artist Alexandra Kehayoglou. There was also Elie Tahari's fall 2015 presentation, which featured models perched on a revolving platform transformed into a makeshift miniature forest. Reviews of Marc Jacobs, Dolce & Gabbana, Dior and Chanel often dedicate as many words to the sets as the collections themselves.

The installation is bound to provide show-goers with more than just an Instagram-ready photo-op — the show title, "Stop and Smell the Flowers," will also serve as a call to action right when they're going to need it.

Front page photo: Peter Michael Dills/Getty Images