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The Real Reason Agent Cooper Doesn't Look Much Older Than He Did in the Original 'Twin Peaks'

We got the scoop from Kyle MacLachlan's (renowned) dermatologist, Dr. David Colbert.
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David Lynch and Kyle MacLachlan at the "Twin Peaks" premiere May 19. Photo: Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

David Lynch and Kyle MacLachlan at the "Twin Peaks" premiere May 19. Photo: Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

It might just be me, but one of the most interesting things I observed during Sunday night's completely insane two-hour premiere of "Twin Peaks: The Return" on Showtime was how differently the stars of the original series have aged in the 25 years since it went off the air. Some look practically the same, while others are barely recognizable; some have clearly had work done, while others appear to have aged naturally. Some characters who previously bore a stark age difference now look to be in the same bracket.

Even when FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper arrived in Twin Peaks in 1990, his age was difficult to discern. With a squared jaw and prominent chin, his face was somehow angular while maintaining a certain softness, his slicked-back hair and black suit revealing nothing about him as a person beyond his occupation, general importance and contrast with the inhabitants of the small Northwest town. All we knew was that he felt too old to succumb to the advances of a teenage Audrey Horne. (Sigh.)

With the exception of his, uh, doppelgänger's very ridiculous makeover, Cooper has maintained the same sort of agelessness in the reboot, and not just by good genes. See, women aren't the only actors getting work done to stay "fresh:" Fifty-eight-year-old actor Kyle MacLachlan has renowned dermatologist and skin-care expert Dr. David Colbert to thank for his tight, smooth face and still-strong jawline.

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Dale Cooper in a still from Showtime's "Twin Peaks." Photo: Suzanne Tenner/SHOWTIME

Dale Cooper in a still from Showtime's "Twin Peaks." Photo: Suzanne Tenner/SHOWTIME

I caught up with Colbert at his Los Angeles satellite office last week; he'd come to town from New York ahead of the "Twin Peaks" premiere, where he'd be accompanying his good friend MacLachlan as his date (MacLachlan's wife gave him the OK). Before filming, he gave MacLachlan his new two-hour "Tie Tuck" treatment, which was introduced during awards season this year and is meant to "redefine the jawline and dramatically reduce the appearance of loose skin in the lower face, chin and neck area" pre-red carpet. (Colbert is also known for prepping women like Naomi Watts, Robin Wright, Sienna Miller and Michelle Williams for red-carpet moments.)

The Tie Tuck includes an "Ultherapy mini face lift," a non-surgical ultrasound that lifts, tones and tightens skin; radio frequency; Kybella, a noninvasive process for reducing fat; Radiesse, a filler to add volume and definition; and Dysport, which is similar to Botox and used to treat drooping in the lower third of the face. Colbert explained that while the eye/forehead area is typically the biggest concern for women, the mouth/jawline area is the priority for men. 

MacLachlan is, of course, not the only man who has received this treatment, but one of the only ones cool with Colbert talking about him. And honestly, that makes us like MacLachlan even more than his stint on "Portlandia" did. If aging naturally isn't your jam (whether for career or personal reasons, or both), why not be forthright about the fact that you've had some (albeit generally noninvasive) work done — especially as a man, when women receive the bulk of speculation and criticism around physical enhancements of this nature. It's no secret that men are doing it, too.

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