Must Read: Selena Gomez Covers the September Issue of 'InStyle,' Hedi Slimane Talks Staging a Fashion Comeback

Plus, Kering and Alibaba Group team up to protect intellectual property.
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Photo: InStyle 

Photo: InStyle 

These are the stories making headlines in fashion on Thursday.

Selena Gomez covers Laura Brown's first September issue at InStyle
Selena Gomez covers the September issue of InStyle that will sell on newsstands, while five subscriber-only special editions feature Marc Jacobs, Stephen Colbert (yes, the "Late Night" talk show host), Carolyn Murphy and Dilone. The cover assortment marks Laura Brown's first September issue as editor-in-chief of the publication — she took the reigns last August— and is an apt metaphor for the collaborative spirit she hoped to bring to the magazine. {Business of Fashion}

Hedi Slimane talks staging a fashion comeback in an interview with Vogue Italia 
Former Saint Laurent designer Hedi Slimane — who left the famed house just last spring — has since been focusing on his pre-YSL photography and art career. In an email exchange with Vogue Italia, Slimane discusses his passion for photography and elaborates on the "secret society" of LA musicians, artists, skaters and surfers that run through his canon. When asked if he would re-enter the world of design, he said: "Going back to design will always be an option, as long as I stay loyal to my principles, and keep protecting the integrity of my work." {Business of Fashion}

Kering and Alibaba Group agree to cooperate in protection of intellectual property
French luxury conglomerate Kering and Alibaba Group made a landmark agreement to unite their efforts to protect intellectual property and take joint enforcement actions online and offline against infringers. This agreement reflects the parties' firm belief that taking proactive measures and using advanced technology will help law enforcement bodies and other relevant authorities address the challenges of intellectual property infringement. {Fashionista Inbox}

Should brands require their influencer partners to sign agreements about conduct? 
In today's slice-of-life selfie world, many brands find posts by influencers to be the most useful method for reaching their target markets. Nonetheless, when a brand retains Instagirls, bloggers, vloggers or other talent to drive awareness and sales through social media, the brand may be inviting unnecessary legal complication unless it has a robust influencer policy. To avoid negative publicity and the cost of defending a regulatory enforcement action, two women at Dentons law firm in New York advise brands to require all endorsers to sign an influencer agreement that outlines standards of conduct and required disclosures. {WWD}

Burberry fills newly created public relations role
Rebecca Martinez joined the communications team at Burberry in 2005, but now she will take on the newly created role of Vice President of PR, Events and Entertainment Relations. In this new position, Martinez will over oversee the global strategic management of all of Burberry’s earned media channels including public relations, events and VIP programs. {Fashionista Inbox}

The social media age has kept social selling alive and well
The social selling concept has been around for decades and was pioneered by the likes of Avon, Mary Kay and Tupperware. Now it has new momentum, thanks to social media and the rise of short-term or freelance work arrangements, which allow brands like Beautycounter— who use direct peer-to-peer selling instead of traditional advertising methods — to reap the benefits. {Business of Fashion}

Uniqlo launches apparel vending machine in airports and shopping malls
The experiential Japanese retailer installed its first of many "Uniqlo to Go" machines in the Oakland International Airport on Wednesday. As the first of its kind, this automated apparel concept with a vending machine-inspired design will appear in 10 select locations around the country including airports and shopping malls. These stations will place Uniqlo’s most innovative products in high-traffic locations to better meet the needs of customers when and where they shop. {Fashionista inbox}

A "Uniqlo to Go" machine. Photo: Uniqlo

A "Uniqlo to Go" machine. Photo: Uniqlo

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