Must Read: How Gucci Made Its Otherworldly Props, 'Black Panther' Merch Is Here

Plus, FIT partners with Complex on a sneaker design course.
Author:
Publish date:
A look from Gucci's Fall 2018 collection. Photo: Imaxtree 

A look from Gucci's Fall 2018 collection. Photo: Imaxtree 

These are the stories making headlines in fashion on Thursday.

How Gucci made its otherworldly props 
On Wednesday, Alessandro Michele accessorized his Fall 2018 collection for Gucci with severed heads, as well as strikingly realistic baby dragons and snakes; you might as well swap your Marmont bag out now for a fantastical pet. His cinema-worthy props came from a partnership with Makinarium, a Rome-based special effects company, and took nearly six months to create. In an illuminating series of images, British Vogue captured the making of the mythical creatures and model craniums from start to finish. {Vogue UK}

"Black Panther" merch is here 
Content creator Pizzaslime has teamed up with the Wu-Tang Clan's clothing line Wu Wear on a range of streetwear for proud Wakandans. Fans of Marvel's "Black Panther" can now sport hoodies, crewnecks and T-shirts emblazoned with the fictional African country in a highlighter yellow atop the rap group's recognizable W logo. {Hypebeast}

FIT partners with Complex on a sneaker design course 
The Fashion Institute of Technology is partnering with Complex to launch an online Sneaker Industry Essentials program to help the rising generation of hypebeasts learn the basics of creating a footwear business. The six-part course will begin in April and will include 30 hours of instruction taught by executives from brands like Nike and Adidas, as well as FIT professors and Complex editors. {Glossy}

Urban Outfitters opens in Paris
Philadelphia-bred Urban Outfitters is making like the rest of the U.S. fashion scene and flocking to Paris. The retail chain opened its first French store on Thursday in a prime location opposite a landmark Paris department store. The two-story building boasts a light-filled layout with gender-neutral fitting rooms and exposed industrial details. {WWD}

China's ultra-rich kids are becoming fashion power players 
The children of affluent Chinese families are known as "feurdai" — a term that is often associated with gross displays of wealth. But not all of these extraordinarily well-off youths are living lavish lifestyles and regularly burning cash; in fact, a growing number of China's rich kids are utilizing their wealth to launch serious fashion businesses. {Business of Fashion}

Inside Amazon's super-efficient warehouses 
We live in a glorious era of Amazon Prime, where we can expect to receive almost any item we dream up — save for Gucci dragons — in 24 hours. And in the process of building a system that promises almost-immediate delivery on millions of products, Amazon has completely redefined warehouse efficiency: Placement of its items is completely random. "Items aren't organized by where they're being shipped; they aren't — aside from very big items — organized by size; and they aren't organized by the type of customer who is likely to order them," writes Sarah Kessler for Quartz. "A shipment of 50 tubes of toothpaste may ultimately be distributed to and stored in 50 different places." {Quartz}

Stay current on the latest trends, news and people shaping the fashion industry. Sign up for our daily newsletter.