Must Read: Sasha Lane Fronts 'Allure''s 'Disruptors' Issue, The North Face to Launch Line Made from Recycled Plastic - Fashionista

Must Read: Sasha Lane Fronts 'Allure''s 'Disruptors' Issue, The North Face to Launch Line Made from Recycled Plastic

Plus, Thredup launched an artist-designed sustainable tee collection.
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Sasha Lane on the "Allure"'s 2018 Disrupters issue. Photo: Scott Trindle

Sasha Lane on the "Allure"'s 2018 Disrupters issue. Photo: Scott Trindle

These are the stories making headlines in fashion on Tuesday.

Sasha Lane fronts Allure's 2018 "disruptors" issue
Allure's "disrupter" issue is all about reshaping how the world thinks about beauty. It spotlights pioneers and innovators in an array of different fashion and beauty-related fields who are breaking barriers and ignoring haters in order to follow their passions and make a positive change. The beauty mag selected actress Sasha Lane to serve as the face of the issue, on account of the fact that she always stays true to her renegade spirit. On the cover, a touch of shimmery amber-colored shadow is swept over Lane's eyelids to compliment her dewy complexion. {Allure

The North Face to launch line made from recycled plastic bottles
On Earth Day, Apr. 22, The North Face is launching a new line of pieces made entirely from recycled plastic bottles collected in National Parks. The Bottle Source collection will include shirts and a tote bag for spring, and will expand with sweatshirts and long sleeve shirts for fall. In addition, the company will give back $1 per item sold from the Bottle Source collection to the National Park Foundation to support park conservation efforts. {Fashionista Inbox} 

Thredup launched an artist-designed sustainable tee collection
Thredup has partnered with 12 artists — from fashion illustrator Julie Houts to ubiquitous meme creator Beige Cardigan — to transform used tees into eco-action. The resale site asked these artists to react to the statement "climate change is not real," and then printed their diverse reactions on 1,000 secondhand tees, which will be sold on Thredup's site leading up to Earth Day. All of the net proceeds from the shirts will go towards the environmental non-profit Cool Effect, supporting global projects that offset carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. You can browse the tees in the gallery below and shop them here. {Fashionista Inbox} 

Twitter temporarily shuts down Yeezy Mafia account
Twitter has suspended the popular Twitter page Yeezy Mafia. A month prior, Kim Kardashian West accused the infamous leakers of sharing false information about Kanye West's clothing line and threatened that she'd make calls to shut down the account. Who's to say if Kim's calls were to blame for the suspension or if Kanye's recent Twitter reincarnation had something to do with it, but as of now, the group is calling for support via its Instagram stories. {Hypebeast

How digital retailers are winning over shoppers 
Traditional retailers are closing physical stores and shifting focus to become more digitally minded businesses. Digital retailers are doing the opposite: Companies like Everlane, Bonobos and Amazon are now setting up physical stores that encourage consumers to interact IRL with their products. The bulk of their sales still occur online, but these digital brands have become masters at understanding consumers and have learned that focusing on convenience and customer experience is key to winning over shoppers. {Adweek

American Apparel makes its U.K. return with a new focus on diversity and positivity 
American Apparel closed 13 stores across the U.K. in late 2016, but the brand is poised to relaunch on British soil on Apr. 23 with a completely reworked site and a new campaign, entitled Back To Basics. The campaign is reminiscent of the brand's original imagery, but swaps the pictures of coquettish young women outstretched in risqué poses for raw, unretouched imagery of a diverse cast of male and female models. {Vogue U.K.

The potential problem with technologically customized cosmetics 
Beauty companies are beginning to offer highly customized products like makeup, shampoos and corrective skin care that are suited perfectly to our needs. But as more companies use technology to develop personalized cosmetics, they need to pay close attention to the issues of accessibility, from a price standpoint, and they need to ensure that they are marketing the products in a way that promotes diversity. Customized beauty does provide a big opportunity for women of color, who have historically been marginalized by the industry, but if these products are not marketed in an inclusive way, then brands run the risk of sending a message that only women with certain skin tones are important to the brand. {Engadget

Ivy Park teamed up with Figure Skating in Harlem to encourage young girls to stay active
Ivy Park teamed up with Figure Skating in Harlem, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping girls transform their lives and build confidence, on a short film and campaign that inspires young women to believe in themselves and strive for greatness — no matter their background or circumstance. With this campaign, the brand aims to show that sports can be all-inclusive and fun, in hopes that young women will build an active foundation that they will carry with them forever and pass on to the next generation. {Fashionista Inbox} 

Ivy Park x Figure Skating in Harlem. Photo: Ivy Park 

Ivy Park x Figure Skating in Harlem. Photo: Ivy Park 

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