Must Read: House of Commons to Investigate the Environmental Cost of UK Fashion Industry, Supreme Court Rules States Can Collect E-Commerce Sales Tax

Plus, friends and family mourn at Kate Spade's funeral.
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A woman photographs French artist Christain Boltanski's "No Man's Land.'" Photo: Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

A woman photographs French artist Christain Boltanski's "No Man's Land.'" Photo: Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

These are the stories making headlines in fashion on Friday. 

House of Commons to investigate the environmental cost of UK fashion industry
The UK's House of Commons Environmental Audit Committee will explore the carbon impact, resource use and water footprint of clothing throughout its lifecycle and supply chain to try to find ways to make the fashion industry more sustainable. The investigation follows a recent study that found people in the UK discard about 300,000 tons of clothing every year, making the fashion industry the fourth most harmful to the environment. {The Guardian

Supreme Court rules states can collect e-commerce sales tax 
Brick-and-mortar stores won their first retail victory in a while, when on Thursday the Supreme Court overturned its 1992 ruling that forced e-commerce firms to collect sales tax only in states where they had a physical presence. The case before the Supreme court stemmed from a law South Dakota passed requiring online retailers to collect and remit sales tax even if they don't have a physical presence in the state. The Supreme Court sided with South Dakota, marking a new territory dispute over the taxing authority of states in the internet age. {WWD}  

Friends and family mourn at Kate Spade's funeral 
Hundreds of mourners gathered in Kansas City on Thursday to attend the funeral for Kate Spade. Many of them paid their respects to the iconic designer by wearing her cheery accessories and speaking fondly about her vibrant character. {Time

Plus-size fashion is having a minimalist moment 
Up until recently, plus-size shoppers didn't have the option to the adopt the clean, minimalist aesthetic presented by brands like Céline. But now, a growing number of plus-size lines and shops like Universal StandardVan Der Nag, And Comfort, MM.LaFleur's First Addition, See Rose Go and Coverstory, are catering to women over size 12 with simple, quality and thoroughly modern designs. {The Cut

Retail robots are picking up steam
Bossa Nova, a robotics company geared toward grocers, announced Thursday that it had raised $29 million in its latest funding round, meaning we're one step closer to seeing robots in our shopping aisles. These artificial intelligence-enhanced robots use a camera to surveil store shelves, taking note of which products need restocking, whether prices are accurate and other inventory-related needs and actions. As of now, the retail robots are better suited for grocery shelves, but various firms are exploring robots capable of recommending apparel. {WWD

Who was the target of Melania Trump's jacket? 
First lady Melania Trump took a trip to the US-Mexico border on Thursday to tour an immigrant children's shelter, wearing an olive green Zara jacket with the words "I really don't care. Do u?" written on the back. Her choice of outerwear caused an internet meltdown, leaving many to question who was the target of its not-so-hidden message. Vanessa Friedman chimed in with a few theories, ranging from "it was intended for her husband" to "it was a message for those of us who like to read messages into her clothes." {The New York Times

Fred Segal to open in Malibu 
Fred Segal is slated to open a Malibu store in early 2019. The new retail post will be smaller and boast a more tightly curated selection of product than its Los Angeles flagship. But it will still include women's apparel, accessories, gifting and jewelry curated by Maris Collective, as well as a men's focused assortment, an exclusive sneaker shop and a separate beauty shop. {Fashionista inbox} 

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