The Untold Tales of Fashion's Invaluable Fit Models: Tory Elizabeth Stone

In our new series, we'll share the stories of fit models, past and present, who will divulge the fascinating minutiae of this little-known but very integral (and well-paid) line of work.
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Photo: Tory Elizabeth Stone

Photo: Tory Elizabeth Stone

Working very much behind-the-scenes and without cameras documenting the process, fit modeling is an invisible but invaluable segment of the fashion industry. Each Friday in the coming weeks, we'll share the stories of eight fit models, past and present, who will divulge the fascinating minutiae of this little-known but very integral (and well-paid) line of work. Next up: Tory Elizabeth Stone, who parlayed her passion for fitness into a modeling career. You can read the rest of the models' testimonials here

"I've been a fit model for about seven months now. My passion and career in the fitness industry led me to the opportunity. I do fit-modeling on the side: I have a full time job serving as the Director of Studios for Studio B at Bandier. Prior to working for Bandier, I worked for SoulCycle. I have done fit modeling for swimwear, activewear and soon I'll be working with bridal, too.

I have the most experience with swimwear. Once a brand or company starts using you, especially for swimwear since the fit is so body-specific, they prefer to stick with you as switching up their clients means having to adjust their measurements, affecting future production and potentially disrupting or complicating the design process. As we all know, no two bodies are exactly alike. I have enjoyed learning more about the design process and seeing all of the hard work that occurs behind the scenes in the design and production process. I also love meeting new people. Fittings can range anywhere from 30 minutes to over three hours, and as someone with limited free time, I find it difficult to make it all fit into my busy schedule. I admittedly am not very patient and hate standing still. 

I thought I would have to give much more feedback than I actually do, to be honest. Most designers will be able to recognize the issue or benefit of whatever it is you are wearing for them and take notes accordingly; however, engagement of some sort is required. As a client, and human being for that matter, I think it is important to let them know how it feels, and help them help you. It can — key word is can — be a lucrative gig, category and brand dependent, of course. The longer you work with a company and the more experience you gain, the more lucrative it becomes."

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