Stuart Vevers Flirts With a Dark Romance for Coach's Fall 2019 Collection

He's one of the rare designers who delivers pretty much the same thing season after season without ever seeming stale.
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A look from the Coach 1941 Fall 2019 runway. Photo: Courtesy of Coach

A look from the Coach 1941 Fall 2019 runway. Photo: Courtesy of Coach

Since Stuart Vevers took the creative lead at Coach back in 2013, he's made Americana prairie florals a key aesthetic for the brand. Regardless of whether he was inspired by "Stranger Things" or sending models kicking down a glittery city street, that look has remained his North Star.

For Fall 2019, Vevers didn't ditch his signature style, but he did dial it down quite a bit — as he did with the set design, an unusually sparse wooden room set up at the American Stock Exchange, with a few metallic sculptures set amongst the benches. Instead, as with the set, the focus was on shapes: Oversize, fuzzy faux-fur vests emblazoned with the Coach logo, black leather bomber jackets with the fabric cut out to reveal the structure of the seams and the fringe, sharply-cut blazers over top-stitched jeans. The bags, too, are becoming more structured, with top-handled styles dominating the selection.

The prairie is still in there, of course, most obviously in the pointed-toe boots and bolero-tie details on button-up dresses, but also in the patchwork quilt prints inspired by artist Kaffe Fassett and deep-hued florals. It's a darker kind of romance that Vevers flirts with here, pairing jewel-toned brocades and dark navy plaids with black lace and burgundy long-line cardigans. 

This being fall, the outerwear is outstanding, especially for the men in shearling-lined buffalo plaids and quilted leathers, as well as color-blocked fleeces with bright orange pulls. The sweaters, too, seem perfectly cozy and slightly punk in oversized fits and tiger-striped prints. There was an aura of unisex style around the whole proceedings — models all wore wallet chains, hoop earrings and creepers regardless of gender — and it isn't difficult to imagine a couple swapping each other an emerald green floral army jacket for a cozy teal fleece.

Vevers is the rare designer who pretty much delivers the same thing season after season without ever seeming stale. He's a welcome talent on the New York scene.

See the complete Coach 1941 collection in the gallery below.

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