Must Read: Get to Know the Chanel Catwalk Crasher, NYC's Fashion Manufacturing Industry Is Expanding

Plus, fashion and beauty brands are diversifying their customer profiles.
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Marie Benoliel climbs the runway to walk with the models during the finale of the Chanel Spring 2020 show. Photo: Victor Boyko/Getty Images

Marie Benoliel climbs the runway to walk with the models during the finale of the Chanel Spring 2020 show. Photo: Victor Boyko/Getty Images

These are the stories making headlines in fashion on Thursday. 

Get to know the Chanel catwalk crasher
Following her surprise cameo in the Chanel show on Tuesday, YouTuber Marie S'Infiltre opened up to The New York Times about her decision to crash the runway. She also explained how she snuck into the venue, where she obtained the tweed suit and her confrontation with Gigi Hadid. {The New York Times}

New York City's fashion manufacturing industry is expanding
The New York City Economic Development Corporation and the Council of Fashion Designers of America announced that the Fashion Manufacturing Initiative received $14 million to expand. The expansion aims to incentivize local fashion manufacturers to produce goods in the city by providing them with grant opportunities, local production credits and workplace skills training. {Fashionista inbox}

Fashion and beauty brands are diversifying their customer profiles
Fashion and beauty brands, once solely focused on marketing to a single type of customer, are now developing their business plans to market to "every single person." The goal is for these companies to create lifetime customers. {Glossy}

Should fashion brands focus on celebrity marketing?
Jennifer Lopez's viral runway appearance at the Versace show is a perfect example of how celebrities can increase a brand's exposure during fashion month. But star power doesn't necessarily translate to sales. Chinese markets have found that no amount of celebrity attention-grabbing tactics can conceal a poor product. {Business of Fashion}

Why Brandy Melville is a guilty pleasure for many millennials
Most millennials — especially those working in fashion — hate that they love Brandy Melville, because the retailer is known for being size- and race-exclusive. And yet, its cult of adult fans continues to grow. So, what gives? Shoppers can't seem to avoid its cute, nostalgic and cheap clothes. {The Cut}

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