Great Outfits in Fashion History: Jeremy O. Harris's Much-Worn Gucci Coat

The "Slave Play" playwright has donned the statement-making jacket for multiple public appearances.
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Jeremy O. Harris in Gucci at the opening night performance of "To Kill A Mockingbird" on Broadway in 2018.

Jeremy O. Harris in Gucci at the opening night performance of "To Kill A Mockingbird" on Broadway in 2018.

There are perfectly good celebrity style moments, and then there are the looks that really stick with you, the ones you try desperately to recreate at home. In 'Great Outfits in Fashion History,' Fashionista editors are revisiting their all-time favorite lewks.

While film and TV stars are routinely elevated to the status of icons in the fashion industry, their peers in the world of theater are often overlooked. But every once in awhile, a personality comes along that fashion just can't ignore — and there's perhaps no one for whom this is truer than Jeremy O. Harris, the playwright behind "Slave Play," which became the most Tony-nominated play in history in 2020.

In an era when the average American likely can't name five playwrights off the top of their head, Harris has managed to become the kind of star who gets invited to the Met Gala and sits front row at fashion week (not to mention that he'll soon make an appearance in Gucci's upcoming film series that also stars Harry Styles and Billie Eilish). Along the way, Harris has worn plenty of great outfits, from head-to-toe Bode suits to Thom Browne ensembles.

Among all these, one of Harris's favorite pieces stands out: a double-breasted Gucci coat that's half classic gray wool, half blaringly red tartan, with a panel at the bottom featuring cartoon characters. On one occasion — the opening night performance of "To Kill a Mockingbird" on Broadway in 2018, to be precise — he combined it with a tan plaid suit, a partially unbuttoned blue floral shirt and a pair of brown leather boots (pictured above). 

But Harris wasn't shy about rewearing the coat. He also wore it to a photocall for his play "Daddy," and again to Build Studios to discuss "Slave Play" in 2019. There are many things that make this look masterful, from the mixing of the prints to the way the classic silhouette provides a bit of structure that counterbalances all the busyness of the colors. Even if you're not feeling quite up to Harris's level when it comes to print-mixing, you can get a taste of another part of what makes this look so delightful — the way that garment seems to be split in half. 

Browse the gallery below for a range of pieces that echo Harris's beautiful mix-and-match moment.

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