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Must Read: Bridal Brands Expect a Boom This Summer, Made-to-Order Clothing Improves Size Inclusivity

Plus, a look at carbon offsetting in the beauty industry.
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These are the stories making headlines in fashion on Friday.

The bridal market is expected to boom this summer
After more than a year of postponements, reschedulings and cancellations, the bridal industry is expected to thrive this summer. "But prepping the brides and grooms of 2022 is coming with new demands," write Chavie Lieber and Darcey Sergison for Business of Fashion. Brides are buying multiple dresses for a variety of scattered celebrations and making decisions more quickly than in the past, allowing less time for alterations, bringing change to the way the bridal gown industry is used to operating. {Business of Fashion}

Made-to-order clothing can offer improvements in size inclusivity
"Made-to-order means something entirely different for plus-size shoppers," writes Eliza Huber for Refinery29, highlighting the opportunity for size inclusivity — as well as sustainability — through custom-made garments. "In the made-to-order space, plus-size shoppers don't have to take it or leave it. Suddenly faced with an abundance of options, they can decide what hems they want and what sleeve-lengths work best for their bodies. It's freeing, and it's also far more practical than placing an order and hoping for the best. When a piece is crafted to your exact measurements, you can pretty much count on it actually fitting when it arrives." {Refinery29}

A look at carbon offsetting in beauty
Taylor Bryant explores "the good, the complicated and the controversial" aspects of carbon offsetting in the beauty industry for Beauty Independent. Talk about "carbon neutrality" is taking off in conversations about sustainability in beauty, but "being carbon neutral doesn’t mean beauty brands don't emit carbon in the course of doing business. It means they're compensating for their emissions by funding efforts to suck up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere equivalent to what they estimate they emit," explains Bryant, who also clears up a whole bunch of other misconceptions in the story. {Beauty Independent}

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