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Must Read: Assessing the Sustainability Progress of 58 Fashion Brands, Thom Browne Reveals 2022 Football Collection

Plus, the trouble with trying to recreate Princess Diana's wardrobe.
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These are the stories making headlines in fashion on Thursday.

The 2022 Remake Fashion Accountability Report
Remake, a global organization that advocates for fair pay and climate justice within the clothing industry, has released its 2022 Remake Fashion Accountability Report. It reviews the social and environmental sustainability progress of of 58 big companies including Chanel and J.Crew and 15 new small sustainable brands. The report states, "only three companies (Burberry, Everlane and H&M Group) met all four of Remake's climate criteria: Disclosure of full emissions; short-term 1.5℃ pathway-aligned Science Based Targets; ambitious long-term net-zero targets; and a reduction in their total greenhouse gas emissions." Other data shows that 7% of companies, including Reformation and Ralph Lauren, have published some progress towards providing a living wage throughout their supply chains, and a lot of moves were made by fast-fashion brands (i.e. Shein and Boohoo) to greenwash. You can read the full report at Remake.world. {Fashionista inbox}

Thom Browne releases 2022 football capsule collection
The designer has released the latest iteration of Thom Browne Football. A tradition since 2014, the collection is usually modeled by a mix of models, actors and industry insiders. This time, Browne hosted a football game at his alma mater, The University of Notre Dame, with students dressed head-to-toe in the new collection, including cashmere knits, pleated skirts and rugby polos. The collection is available to shop now at ThomBrowne.com. {Fashionista inbox}

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The trouble with trying to recreate Princess Diana's wardrobe
For Harper's Bazaar, Rachel Tashjian covers the season five premiere of "The Crown" on Netflix. The season covers the 1990s-set decline of Princess Diana and Prince Charles' marriage, which also happens to coincide with the height of Diana's fashion statements. The emotional and psychological state of the People's Princess was heavily intertwined with her clothing choices, raising the stakes for the series' wardrobe department to get the costumes just right in order to accurately depict Diana's story. Tashjian argues that many of the outfits shown look, simply put, "off." {Harper's Bazaar}

Why are fashion brands opening standalone gyms?
Brands such as Alo Yoga, Hermès and Aviator Nation are opening standalone fitness studios as a way to drive sales of their athleisure attire. "Anytime we do a special event-specific or location-specific collection, it flies off the shelves," Paige Mycoskie, founder of Aviator Nation, said. Similarly, Alo Yoga opened its first membership-by-invite-only Wellness Club in Los Angeles last April. Mycoskie explained the strategy saying, "A standalone fitness studio is not going to make a lot of money off of fitness classes alone. The money is in the merchandise, which is why this concept works for us, from a financial perspective." {Glossy}

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