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Must Read: Malone Souliers Launches 'Emily in Paris' Shoe Collection, How Resale Saved New York Retail

Plus, the body behind the Y/Project x Jean Paul Gaultier body morph prints.

These are the stories making headlines in fashion on Monday.

Malone Souliers launches "Emily in Paris" shoe collection
In anticipation of the third season of "Emily in Paris," Malone Souliers teamed up with the show for a "très chic" shoe collaboration. The collection boasts 11 new styles in a variety of colorways inspired by the characters of the show, including The Emily, The Camille and The Gabriel. "Like everyone else, I became obsessed with 'Emily in Paris' when it first aired in 2020," Mary Alice, the brand's creative director, said in a statement. "The witty humor is what first drew me in, but then I couldn't take my eyes off the outfits. I knew it would be the perfect show for Malone Souliers to collaborate with." The collection is available to shop Dec. 6 at the brand's Mount Street flagship store and online at MaloneSouliers.com. {Fashionista inbox}

The rise of resale in New York retail
For The Cut, Emilia Petrarca interviews Emma Rodelius, founder of Lower East Side vintage shop Rogue, about how the neighborhood has shifted retail trends in New York. Rodelius calls the Lower East Side "the new Soho" and adds that it's gone too corporate for her. Nostalgic resale and vintage finds for accessible prices are what attract customers to what she has coined the "Vintage District." With the help of pop-up events, influencer closet sales and a strong social media presence, Rodelius says, "This is going to be an empire." {The Cut}

The body behind the Y/Project x Jean Paul Gaultier body morph prints
For Vogue, José Criales-Unzueta talks to the literal man in the multi-colored body-illusion graphics Glenn Martens designed in collaboration with Jean Paul Gaultier, which have been spotted on A-listers galore. Javier Des Leon, Spanish model and content creator, describes the birth of the print saying, "Glenn was interested in me, so they asked me to be a part of the next collection. I didn't know what I would do or what the process would be like. They just told me I had to be nude and pose as a statue. It was a simple process, just working the lighting and trying to find the right pose." When asked what it feels like to see his body on runways, tabloids and celebrities, Des Leon says, "I'm just very proud to have been a part of this and grateful to Glenn and his team. He's a genius, and I love the direction in which he's leading fashion right now." {Vogue}

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Homepage Photo: Courtesy of Malone Souliers

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